Half (50%) of Citizens in 24 Nations Say There are Too Many Immigrants in their Country – and 46% Agree that Immigration is Causing their Country to Change in Ways they Don’t Like

Only 21% Say Immigration has had a Positive Impact or Been Good for their Economy (28%) and almost Half (45%) Believe Immigrants have made it More Difficult for their Own People to Get Jobs

Thursday, August 06, 2015

Toronto, Canada – A new Ipsos global poll finds that fully half (50%) of those citizens surveyed in 24 countries say there are too many immigrants in their country—and almost as many (46%) agree that immigration is causing their country to change in ways they don’t like.

Against a backdrop where 81% of citizens indicate that over the last five years migrants have increased in their country (and just 30% say immigrants make their country a more interesting place to live) only one in five (21%) citizens surveyed say immigration has had a positive impact on their country only three in 10 (28%) say immigration has been good for their economy.

Further, half (50%) say immigration has placed too much pressure on public services in their country.

And almost half (45%) of global respondents believe immigrants have made it more difficult for their own people to get jobs in their country (and just 41% say priority should be given to immigrants with higher education and qualifications to fill shortages in professions.)

This is the fourth time the survey has been undertaken—previously in 2014, 2013 and 2011—and tracking comparisons are noted throughout the findings. For this iteration completed this month, a total of 17,533 respondents were interviewed throughout 24 countries including Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Great Britain, Germany, Hungary, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Turkey and the United States of America.

81% of citizens indicate that over the last five years migrants have increased in their country…

A majority (81% +3 since 2014) indicate that over the last five years migrants have increased in their country.

Those countries most likely to indicate that migrants have increased in their country over last five years begin with Turkey (97% – +5 points since 2014 and +16 from 2011) followed by Italy (94% +4 since 2014), South Africa (93% +5), Hungary (91% +10), Russia (90% -3), Sweden (88% +11 since 2014 and +22 since 2011), Argentina (87% -2), Germany (87% +3 since 2014 and +21 since 2011), Brazil (86% -2), France (86% +9), Belgium (84% -1), Mexico (83% +4), India (81% -1), Poland (81% +4), Great Britain (80% -2) Israel (79% n/a), China (77% -4), Saudi Arabia (77% +14), Australia (73% -1 and -8 since 2011) Canada (70% -6) United States (69% +4 and -12 since 2011), South Korea (62% -3) Japan (60% +8) and Spain (58% +2 and -29 since 2011).

Half (50%) say there are too many immigrants in their country…

Half (50% +2 since 2014 and -2 since 2011) of citizens surveyed in 24 countries believe that there are too many immigrants in their country.

Turkey (92% +9 and +41 since 2011) leads all of the 24 countries surveyed believing that there are too many immigrants in their own country followed by Italy (71% +4), Russia (69% -4 and -8 since 2011), South Africa (62% +1), Belgium (61% -2 and +11 since 2011), India (61% +5), France (60% +2 and +8 since 2011), Great Britain (60% n/c but -11 since 2011), Saudi Arabia (59% -6), Israel (58% n/a), Argentina (57% n/c), Hungary (54% +8), United States (49% +1 but -10 since 2011), Spain (48% n/c but -19 since 2011), Australia (44% +1 but -8 since 2011) sees, Germany (43% -8), Sweden (43% +6), Canada (39% -1), Brazil (36% -6), Mexico (35% -9), South Korea (33% +3 and +9 since 2011), China (32% +8), Poland (32% +8) and Japan (13% -3).

And almost as many (46%) agree that immigration is causing their country to change in ways they don’t like…

Almost half (46%) of citizens surveyed agree that immigration is causing their country to change in ways they don’t like. This is particularly true in Turkey (84%) that leads the list followed by Italy (65%), Russia (59%), Belgium (58%), France (57%), Israel (57%), South Africa (54%), Great Britain (54%), Hungary (52%), India (52%), Australia (49%), Argentina (47%), United States (43%), Spain (44%), Canada (43%), Germany (41%), Poland (39%), Saudi Arabia (38%), Sweden (36%), Mexico (32%), China (29%), South Korea (25%), [Brazil (25%) and Japan (22%). [This question was asked for the first time this year, 2015 and has no tracking.]

Only one in five (21%) say immigration has had a positive impact…

Only one in five (21% n/c since 2014) citizens from the 24 countries surveyed say that immigration has generally had a positive impact on their country – and there has been no change in this figure between 2011 and 2015.

The country that is most likely to indicate that immigration has generally had a positive impact is Saudi Arabia (52% +22 since 2014) and is followed by India (49% +8), Canada (37% +4), Australia (36% +4), Sweden (31% -8), China (29% +13), Great Britain (28% +2 and +9 since 2011), the United States (25% n/c since 2014 but +7 since 2011), Brazil (23% -12), Spain (21% no change), Germany (20% +5), South Africa (20% +4 and + $.10 2011) South Korea (19% -6), Israel (18% n/a), Mexico (16% +2), Argentina (15% -2), Poland (15% -5), Japan (13% n/c), Belgium (12% +2), France (11% -1), Russia (11% +3), Hungary (6% -2), Italy (5% -4) and Turkey (2% n/c).

Only three in 10 (28%) say immigration has been good for the economy of their country…

Only three in 10 (28% +1 since 2014) of citizens in 24 countries indicate that immigration is good for the economy of their country.

This belief is most likely expressed by those in Saudi Arabia (52% +8 since 2014 and +11 since 2011) followed by those in India (48% +8), China (44% +9), Canada (43% +3) Australia (41% +4), Great Britain (38% +6 and +11 since 2011), Sweden (38% +1 and +10 since 2011), South Africa (36% +9 and +18 since 2011), Brazil (33% -4 and -14 since 2011), United States (30% +2 and +7 since 2011), Germany (27% +4), Spain (26% -1), South Korea (23% -3 and -7 since 2011), Israel (22% n/a), Mexico (22% -1 and -5 2011, Argentina (20% -5) Japan (20% -3 and -6 since 2011), Belgium (19% +3), Poland (17% -7 and -11 six 2011) France (15% -4 and -9 since 2011), Italy (14% -4 and -16 since 2011), Turkey (14% +3), Hungary (13% -1) and Russia (13% +1).

And half (50%) say immigration has placed too much pressure on public services in their country…

Half (50% +1 since 2014 and steady since 2011) of those citizens surveyed in the 24 countries indicate that immigration is placed too much pressure on public services in their country.

Leading the list of those countries with citizens feeling that their public services are beleaguered by immigrants is Turkey (81% +9 since 2014 and +36 since 2011) followed by Great Britain (68% n/c since 2014 and -86 2011), Italy (67% + for and +11 six 2011), Israel (62% n/a), India (61% +1), France (60% -1), South Africa (59% -2), United States (58% n/c and -8 since 2011), Belgium (56% -7 and -12 since 2011), Argentina (53% n/c and -9 since 2011), Hungary (53% n/c and -6 since 2011), Australia (52% -4 and -12 since 2011), Spain (52% -4 and -18 since 2011), Saudi Arabia (49% -10), Germany (47% -5 and -11 since 2011), Canada (45% -6 and -11 six 2011), Sweden (45% +8), Russia (43% -5), China (38% +11), Brazil (37% -2), Mexico (34% n/c), Poland (34% + for and +7 since 2011), South Korea (31% -3 and +6 since 2011) and Japan (21% -4 and -7 since 2011).

Almost half (45%) say immigrants in their country have made it more difficult for their own people to get jobs…

Almost half (45% -1 since 2014 and -3 since 2011) of citizens surveyed in 24 countries indicate that immigrants in their country have made it more difficult for their own nationals to get jobs.

Leading the list of countries who citizens believe that immigrants made it more difficult for their own citizens to get jobs is Turkey (85% +13 since 2014 and +24 since 2011) followed by those in Russia (68% -3 and -7 since 2011), Argentina (56% -1 and -5 since 2011), India (55% +3), Italy (54% -3), South Africa (54% -4 and -10 since 2011), Belgium (52% +2 and +6 since 2011), France (48% +2 and +7 since 2011), Great Britain (48% -3 and -14 since 2011), United States (48% -3 and -12 since 2011), Saudi Arabia (47% -10), Australia (46% -5), Poland (46% +10), Israel (44% n/c), Spain (41% -4 and -11 since 2011), Hungary (40% -13), Canada (39% -8), Brazil (36% -3), China (33% +5), South Korea (32% -6), Germany (30% -5 and -7 since 2011), Mexico (29% -3), Sweden (25% +7) and Japan (24% -5 and -14 since 2011).

Four in 10 (41%) believe priority should be given to immigrants with higher education and qualifications to fill professions shortages…

Four in 10 (41% -1 and -4 since 2011) of citizens in the 24 countries surveyed believe that priority should be given to immigrants with higher education and qualifications you can fill shortages among certain professions in their country.

Those citizens in South Africa (60% +5 since 2014 and +4 since 2011) are most likely to represent this point of view followed by those in China (55% +3 and +9 since 2013), India (55% +7), Saudi Arabia (55% -1), Great Britain (54% -5), Russia (50% -5 and -7 since 2011, Canada (49% -8 and -13 since 2011), Australia (46% +2 but -15 since 2011), Turkey (44% +1 but -5 since 2011), Germany (43% -4), Sweden (42% +3), Belgium (40% -5), Mexico (40% +8), Israel (38% n/a), France (37% -9), United States (35% +2), Argentina (34% -2), Hungary (34% +1 but -7 since 2011), Poland (31% + for), South Korea (31% +2), Spain (31% -5), Brazil (30% -9), Japan (26% -2 and -8 since 2011) and Italy (24% -2 and -12 since 2011).

Only three in 10 (30%) say immigrants make their country a more interesting place to live…

Just three in 10 (30% n/c since 2014) of citizens in 24 countries indicate that immigration is good for the economy of their country.

Those citizens in China (48% +3 since 2014 and +11 since 2013) are most likely to say that immigrants make their country more interesting place to live followed by those in Australia (47% +2), Canada (47% +1), India (46% +2), Saudi Arabia (42% +2), United States (41% + for and +5 since 2011), Great Britain (40% +2 and +7 since 2011), South Africa (38% +7 and +12 since 2011), Brazil (37% -5 and -15 since 2011), Germany (33% -2), Turkey (28% +5), Argentina (23% -2), Poland (23% -8 and -16 since 2011), Mexico (22% +4), Belgium (20% n/c), France (20% -3 and -8 since 2011), Spain (20% +1), South Korea (19% n/c), Israel (19% n/a), Hungary (18% -2 and -5 since 2011), Japan (14% -2 and -4 since 2011), Italy (13% -3 and -5 since 2011) and Russia (9% +1).

The study is based on interviews conducted via Ipsos’ Global @dvisor online Omnibus from June 19 to July 3, 2015 with interviews of 17,533 adults across 24 countries. Approximately 500 interviews were conducted in each of Argentina, Belgium, Hungary, India, Israel, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden and Turkey; approximately 1,000 interviews conducted in each of Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Japan, Spain and the United States. Respondents were age 18-64 in the US and Canada, and age 16-64 in all other countries. Data are weighted to age, gender, region and household income based on recent Census and/or population figures for each country. The global numbers were calculated such that each market was given equal weight when aggregated (unweighted base size = 500 for all) Where internet penetration is more than approx. 60%, the data output is comparable to the general population. Of those surveyed, 16 countries yield results that are balanced to reflect the general population: Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Japan, Poland, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom and the United States. The eight remaining countries surveyed –Brazil, China, India, Mexico, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa and Turkey – reflect online populations that tend to be more urban and have higher education/income than the general population. As such, for total population comparisons the total global group surveyed can be referred collectively as Primary Consumer Citizens. The precision of Ipsos online polls are calculated using a credibility interval. In this case, a poll of 1,000 is accurate to +/- 3.5 percentage points and one of 500 is accurate to +/- 5.0 percentage points in their respective general populations.

For more information on this news release, please contact:

Julia Clark
Senior Vice President
Ipsos Public Affairs
312.526.4919
julia.clark@ipsos.com

About Ipsos

Ipsos is an independent market research company controlled and managed by research professionals. Founded in France in 1975, Ipsos has grown into a worldwide research group with a strong presence in all key markets. Ipsos ranks third in the global research industry.

With offices in 87 countries, Ipsos delivers insightful expertise across five research specializations: brand, advertising and media, customer loyalty, marketing, public affairs research, and survey management.

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Half (50%) of Citizens in 24 Nations Say There are Too Many Immigrants in their Country – and 46% Agree that Immigration is Causing their Country to Change in Ways they Don’t Like

Contact

Julia Clark
Senior Vice President, US
Ipsos Public Affairs
+1.312.526.4919
julia.clark@ipsos.com