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Pent Up Or Fed Up?

Rising Gas Prices Fuel Anger, Potentially Explosive Majority (55%) of Canadians Say They’re ‘Mad’ or Angry’, But Others Are Content (26%) Or Resigned (18%)

Monday, July 28, 2008

Toronto, ON – A new Ipsos Reid poll conducted on behalf of CanWest News Service and Global Television reveals that a majority of Canadians might be at a tipping point with their anger over issues that affect them. The only two questions that could be asked and can’t yet be answered: what issue will be the lynch pin, and when it could happen.

But it’s clear that rising gas prices may be the most volatile and explosive issue for Canadians and their anger—well ahead of other issues nowadays.

In fact, the poll shows that the majority (55%) is composed of two agitated groups when thinking about the issue or issues of concern facing themselves, their family or other Canadians—two in ten (20%) who describe their overall mood by saying that they’re ‘really angry’ and they are ‘for sure going to/already doing something about it’ and another one in three (35%) for whom the situation is even more precarious: they’re ‘really upset but not able to do anything about it’, so they keep their feelings ‘bottled up’ until they can do something about it.

On the other hand, one quarter (26%) of Canadians say they’re ‘fairly content because these issues really don’t affect or matter that much’ to them. But for two in ten (18%), there appears to be a sense of defeat, saying that they feel ‘resigned pretty much not to do anything since there’s no sense making any noise because nothing ever happens as a result’.

Focusing on six key issues facing Canadians today – the rising price of gas, inaction on helping the environment, Canada’s participation in the war in Afghanistan, crime in their neighbourhood, taxes, and the action of the Chinese government in Tibet – it appears that Canadians have a varying degree of anger for each.

Statement 1: ‘Really angry and I’m for sure going to/already doing something about it’…20%

While two in ten Canadians (20%) indicate that this describes their current overall mood when thinking about issues that concern them or their family, some groups of people are more likely than others to feel this way. Women (23%) are more likely than men (17%) to indicate this is the case, and Canadians with some post-secondary education (24%) or a university degree (24%) are more likely to feel this way than those with their high school diploma (15%) and those without their diploma (16%).

Canadians living in Atlantic Canada (29%) and British Columbia (26%) are much more likely to feel this way, compared to residents of Ontario (20%), Alberta (18%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (18%), and Quebec (16%).

Thinking specifically about certain issues, it appears that some issues have Canadians angrier than others:

  • Inaction on helping the environment (28%)
  • Rising gas prices (25%)
  • Crime in their neighbourhood (19%)
  • Taxes (13%)
  • Canada’s participation in the War on Afghanistan (10%)
  • Actions of the Chinese government in Tibet (9%).

Statement 2: ‘Really upset but not able to do anything about it, so I keep it bottled up until I can’…35%

Again, while one in three (35%) Canadians feel this way overall about issues concerning them or their family, certain groups are more inclined to do so. Men (37%) are slightly more likely than women (34%) to indicate this is the case, as are younger Canadians (39%) slightly more likely than middle-aged (33%) and older (34%) Canadians to do the same.

Alarmingly, nearly half the population of Quebec (45%) identifies with this sentiment. Residents of Atlantic Canada (36%), Alberta (34%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (34%), Ontario (32%), and British Columbia (27%) are less likely to do so.

Similarly, certain issues are more likely than others to bring about this reaction in Canadians:

  • Rising price of gas (46%)
  • Taxes (40%)
  • Canada’s participation in the war in Afghanistan (37%)
  • Inaction on helping the environment (34%)
  • Actions of the Chinese government in Tibet (34%)
  • Crime in their neighbourhood (32%).

Statement 3: ‘Fairly content because it/they really don’t affect or matter that much to me’…26%

One in four Canadians (26%) fall into this category, saying that one way or another, their attitude is that the issues of the day don’t concern them too much. Men (30%) are more likely than women (22%) to feel this way, and university graduates (33%) are more likely than those with some post-secondary education (24%), a high school diploma (26%) or less (25%) to do the same.

Residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (36%) are most likely to indicate this is the case, followed by Canadians living in British Columbia (29%), Alberta (28%), Quebec (26%), Ontario (25%), and Atlantic Canada (20%). As well, those with an annual household income over $60K (29%) are more likely than those with an income between $30K and $60K (26%) and those with an income below $30K (22%) to feel unaffected by today’s issues.

  • Crime in their neighbourhood (36%)
  • Actions of the Chinese government in Tibet (32%)
  • Canada’s participation in the war in Afghanistan (29%)
  • Inaction on helping the environment (23%)
  • Taxes (19%)
  • Rising price of gas (9%)

Statement 4: ‘Resigned pretty much not to do anything since there’s no sense making any noise because nothing ever happens as a result’…18%

Women (21%) are slightly more likely than men (16%) to feel resigned to not being able to do anything about today’s issues. As well, those with their high school diploma (23%) or without it (20%) are more likely than university graduates (13%) and those with some post-secondary education (16%) to feel the same way.

Ontarians (23%) are most likely to indicate this is the case, followed by Canadians living in Alberta (20%), British Columbia (17%), Atlantic Canada (16%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (14%), and Quebec (13%).

Again, certain issues are more likely than others to cause Canadians to want to throw in the towel:

  • Taxes (28%)
  • Actions of the Chinese government in Tibet (25%)
  • Canada’s participation in the war in Afghanistan (24%)
  • Rising price of gas (20%)
  • Inaction on helping the environment (14%)
  • Crime in their neighbourhood (13%)

Analysis by Issue: The Volatility Index

Gas Prices – 71%

Seven in ten Canadians (71%) say that when it comes to gas prices, either they are angry enough that they are already doing something about it (25%) or they are very upset but cannot do anything about it (46%).

Regionally speaking, residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (79%), Quebec (79%), and Atlantic Canada (78%) are most likely to fall into these two categories on this issue, while those living in Alberta (68%), Ontario (67%), and British Columbia (63%) are less likely.

On the other hand, three in ten (29%) say that they are either content because they are unaffected by the issue (9%) or that they have resigned themselves not to do anything about it (20%).

Residents of British Columbia (36%) are most likely to feel this way, followed by those living in Ontario (34%), Alberta (33%), Atlantic Canada (22%), Quebec (22%), and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (21%).

Inaction on Helping the Environment – 62%

For six in ten Canadians (62%), inaction on helping the environment is enough to make them do something about it (28%) or make them really upset and bottle up their feelings (34%).

Canadians living in Atlantic Canada (71%) and Quebec (71%) are most likely to feel this way, followed by residents of Ontario (64%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (58%), British Columbia (51%), and Alberta (47%).

Meanwhile, four in ten (37%) say that they feel content about the issue, either because they are unaffected (23%) or because they have resigned themselves to defeat (14%).

Residents of Alberta (52%) are most likely to feel this way, followed by those living in British Columbia (48%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (43%), Ontario (37%), Atlantic Canada (20%), and Quebec (29%).

Taxes – 53%

A majority of Canadians (53%) say that when thinking about taxes, they are either angry enough that they have done or will do something about it (13%) or they have bottled up their anger (40%).

Canadians living in Atlantic Canada (62%) and Quebec (60%) are most likely to indicate this is the case, followed by those living in Ontario (51%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (51%), British Columbia (50%), and Alberta (49%).

On the other hand, nearly half (47%) say that they are either content because this issue doesn’t affect them (19%) or have resigned themselves not to do anything about it (28%).

Residents of British Columbia (51%), Alberta (50%), Ontario (50%), and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (49%) are most likely to feel this way, while those living in Quebec (40%) and Atlantic Canada (38%) are less likely.

Crime in Your Neighbourhood – 51%

Half (51%) of all Canadians say that crime in their neighbourhood is something that either pushes them to action (19%) or forces them to bottle up their anger (32%).

Canadians living in Quebec (56%) are most likely to indicate this is the case, followed by residents of Atlantic Canada (52%), Alberta (52%), British Columbia (49%), Ontario (48%), and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (47%).

On the other hand, half (49%) say that either this issue doesn’t affect them (36%) or they are resigned not to do anything (13%).

Canadians living in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (53%) are most likely to feel this way, followed by those living in Ontario (52%), British Columbia (52%), Alberta (48%), Atlantic Canada (47%), and Quebec (44%).

Canada’s Participation in the War in Afghanistan – 47%

Nearly half (47%) of all Canadians say that Canada’s participation in the War in Afghanistan has either made them angry enough to do something about it (10%) or made them bottle up anger (37%).

Residents of Atlantic Canada (59%) and Quebec (59%) are most likely to feel this way, followed by those living in Ontario (45%), British Columbia (39%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (39%), and Alberta (38%).

On the other hand, a majority (53%) say they are either unaffected by the issue (29%) or resigned not to do anything about it (24%).

Residents of Alberta (62%) are most likely to say this is how they feel, followed closely by those living in British Columbia (61%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (61%), Ontario (54%), Quebec (42%), and Atlantic Canada (42%).

The Actions of the Chinese Government in Tibet – 43%

Four in ten (43%) Canadians say that the actions of the Chinese government in Tibet have either made them angry enough to do something about it (9%) or made them bottle up anger (34%).

Canadians living in Quebec (49%) are most likely to feel this way, followed by residents of British Columbia (44%), Ontario (43%), Atlantic Canada (42%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (36%), and Alberta (31%).

On the other hand, six in ten (57%) say that either they are unaffected by the issue (32%) or they are resigned not to do anything (25%).

Residents of Alberta (69%) are most likely to indicate this is the case, followed by those living in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (64%), Atlantic Canada (59%), Ontario (57%), British Columbia (56%), and Quebec (51%).

These are the findings of an Ipsos Reid poll conducted on behalf of CanWest News Service and Global Television from 05/22 to 05/26, 2008. This online survey of 1022 Canadian adults was conducted via the Ipsos I-Say Online Panel, Ipsos Reid's national online panel. The results are based on a sample where quota sampling and weighting are employed to balance demographics and ensure that the sample's composition reflects that of the actual Canadian population according to Census data. Quota samples with weighting from the Ipsos online panel provide results that are intended to approximate a probability sample. An unweighted probability sample of this size, with a 100% response rate, would have an estimated margin of error of +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

For more information on this news release, please contact:
John Wright
Senior Vice President
Ipsos Reid
Public Affairs
(416) 324-2002
john.wright@ipsos-reid.com

About Ipsos Reid
Ipsos Reid is Canada's market intelligence leader, the country's leading provider of public opinion research, and research partner for loyalty and forecasting and modelling insights. With operations in eight cities, Ipsos Reid employs more than 600 research professionals and support staff in Canada. The company has the biggest network of telephone call centres in the country, as well as the largest pre-recruited household and online panels. Ipsos Reid's marketing research and public affairs practices offer the premier suite of research vehicles in Canada, all of which provide clients with actionable and relevant information. Staffed with seasoned research consultants with extensive industry-specific backgrounds, Ipsos Reid offers syndicated information or custom solutions across key sectors of the Canadian economy, including consumer packaged goods, financial services, automotive, retail, and technology & telecommunications. Ipsos Reid is an Ipsos company, a leading global survey-based market research group.

To learn more, please visit www.ipsos.ca.

About Ipsos
Ipsos is a leading global survey-based market research company, owned and managed by research professionals. Ipsos helps interpret, simulate, and anticipate the needs and responses of consumers, customers, and citizens around the world.

Member companies assess market potential and interpret market trends. They develop and build brands. They help clients build long-term relationships with their customers. They test advertising and study audience responses to various media. They measure public opinion around the globe.

Ipsos member companies offer expertise in advertising, customer loyalty, marketing, media, and public affairs research, as well as forecasting, modeling, and consulting. Ipsos has a full line of custom, syndicated, omnibus, panel, and online research products and services, guided by industry experts and bolstered by advanced analytics and methodologies. The company was founded in 1975 and has been publicly traded since 1999.

In 2007, Ipsos generated global revenues of €927.2 million ($1.27 billion U.S.).

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Pent Up Or Fed Up?



Contact

JohnWright John Wright
Senior Vice President / Premier Vice-Président
Global @dvisor
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